Monday, January 18, 2016

The Oiling of America


I have no idea if what is said here is true.  I am making no claims. I think that it deserves further research.  Wikipedia says "Price's core assumptions as contrary to contemporary medical understanding." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weston_A._Price_Foundation)

--

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

That Sugar Film

Just watched "That Sugar Film" on Amazon Prime. It is more like I skimmed through the film because I didn't want to be bothered with all the details and some of the flashy gimmicks the film uses to present information.

The bottom line is that an Australian man changed his diet to include 40 teaspoons of sugar per day, which according to the film is the typical consumption of the average Australian male. His total daily calorie intake was about the same as it was before he went on this diet. After 60 days he had gained a significant amount of weight and showed signs of fatty liver disease, insulin resistance, and other health problems. Then he went off of the sugar diet and within a couple of months his health and weight had returned to normal.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

re: popcorn popper

Been using these microwave popcorn bowls for around 15 years ...


I used to use a kitchen scale to measure my ingredients exactly.  Now I just throw stuff into the bowl without measuring.

My recipe for perfect popcorn is ...

Place the following in the microwave popcorn bowl ...

4 oz of premium popcorn
1/4 to 1/2 ounce of Lite Salt,  This salt has a flavor that I like.    (Or salt after you pop it.  If you add the salt before you pop it, then you need more salt because at least half of it will end up in the bottom of the bowl.) 
2 oz of canola oil.  (Oil will cover popcorn and salt.   After dozens of uses, the oil will give the bowl a yellow color.)

It takes about 3 to 4 minutes to microwave.

Saturday, September 5, 2015

Sugar vs. Fat

I watched this great BBC documentary called "Sugar vs. Fat.".  

I found a version on youtube, but it the youtube version looks too dark:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nT-vACI-jg

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Fwd: Food


'Based on the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee's recent recommendations, this Viewpoint urges the US Department of Agriculture and US Department of Health and Human Services to remove limits on total fat consumption in their 2015 Dietary Guideline to promote consumption of healthful fat.'

 

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2338262

 




Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Fwd: cholesterol

'The nation's top nutrition advisory panel will drop its caution about eating cholesterol-laden food, a move that could undo almost 40 years of government warnings.
​​
The group's finding that cholesterol in the diet need no longer be considered a ''nutrient of concern'' stands in contrast to its findings five years ago, the last time it convened. During those proceedings, as in previous years, the panel deemed ''excess dietary cholesterol'' a public health concern…

But the finding follows an evolution of thinking among many nutritionists who now say that, for a healthy adult, cholesterol intake may not significantly affect the level of cholesterol in the blood or increase the risk of heart disease.'

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/nation/2015/02/11/poised-withdraw-longstanding-warnings-about-cholesterol/AdDWztSEXxDeM2waVH5ifP/story.html

... there are many caveats in the article.  Seems to me that caution and a reasonably healthy diet are still wise.  The article complains about trans fat and ​saturated fat.   As far as I know, both come from animal products.  Funny how a different study said that effect of saturated fat wasn't statistically significant and still yet another study said that a low fat diet is not a good idea.  Confused yet?  I have been eating a diet heavy in unsaturated fats and low in sugar.  I have been eating more veggies too.  According to my doctor, my blood test showed a low risk for heart disease.  

However, blood tests aren't a perfect predictor either.  I have seen articles claiming that inflammation is a risk factor for heart disease.


Thursday, January 8, 2015

Fwd: Law

'Striking a blow for the freedom to eat the bloated livers of ducks and geese force-fed grain through tubes, a federal judge invalidated California's 2012 ban of foie gras.

http://www.allgov.com/usa/ca/news/top-stories/federal-judge-jokingly-strikes-down-state-foie-gras-ban-that-runs-afoul-of-us-law-150108?news=855312

So California cannot ban something Federal law allows….Colorado can allow something Federal law bans….and Arizona cannot pass a law identical to federal law to ban the same thing federal law does.

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Fwd: Caramel Apples

'Five people have died and 21 others have been hospitalized in a listeria outbreak linked to caramel apples, federal health officials said today.
 
A total of 28 people infected with listeria have been reported from 10 states...The states include Missouri and New Mexico, which each had five cases; Minnesota, Texas and Arizona, with four cases each; Wisconsin, with two cases; and Washington, California, Utah and North Carolina, with one case each.'
 

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Fwd: Glycemic index

'Some studies have suggested that carbs with a low glycemic index—such as whole grains—led to fewer spikes in blood sugar, and therefore more efficient breakdown into energy, while higher glycemic index foods—including refined flours—led to larger peaks in glucose that the body couldn't process and therefore stored as fat.

So two of the diets in the study were high in carbs overall, but one was made up of low-glycemic-index foods while the other was composed of high-glycemic-index foods. The other two diets were low in carbs overall, with the same breakdown or low- and high-glycemic items

​...​

In fact, among those eating the high-carb diets, those consuming low-glycemic-index foods had worse insulin response and higher LDL cholesterol…

we did not show that the glycemic index of the carb really had any favorable effect," says Sacks.

That suggests that all the attention to knowing the glycemic index of various foods—and basing your eating habits on these numbers—may not be worth the effort.'

​...

Overall, those eating the low-carb diets had lower risk factors for heart disease compared to the group eating more carbohydrates, but the type of carbs didn't seem to make much difference​

http://time.com/3636690/glycemic-index-heart-health-low-carb/


Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Fwd: Food orders

Fans of Chick-fil-A can now get their food quicker, with the help of an updated app that allows customers to pay using their smartphones and order their food ahead of time.

"Customers really love using their mobile devices," said Khalilah Cooper, leader of ordering strategy at Chick-fil-A. "And we really want to give our guests the opportunity to order what they want, when they want, and how they want."

While the chain launched their current app, free to download from iTunes or Google Play, last year, the mobile payment feature wasn't added until Monday.

The new function allows users nationwide to use their phones to purchase their meal just by scanning their phones at the register, thus avoiding the hassle of having to fumble for cash or cards.'

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2014/12/09/chickfila-app-pay-order/20107393/

I think that scanning a phone is hardly different than swiping a card.  In fact, if I have to load the app, it is more difficult.

​In fact, we are coming up with clever ways to avoid human interaction.​